The student news site of Palo Verde High School

Panther Print

#TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

by Lainey Harlow, Junior Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Rating: 9/10
Director: Jonathan Kaplan
Starring: Matt Dillon, Pamela Ludwig
MPAA Rating: PG

What causes people to commit senseless, destructive acts? Boredom? Pent-up aggression?

Over the Edge takes teen angst to the extreme. Set in a “perfect” planned suburban community, the film serves as an example, albeit exaggerated, of what drives adolescents to act out.

The suburb lacks parks and activities for the children, and many of the parents and teachers are uninvolved and unaware. Most of the town’s youth passes free time in the recreation center, which has become a hub of drugs, alcohol, and violence.

Michael Eric Kramer stars as Carl Willat, a city councilman’s previously docile and well-behaved fifteen-year-old son. While many of the children have taken drug use, vandalism, Carl refrains from such activities.

Despite the warnings of both his parents and local police officers, Carl grows close with Richie White, a troubled delinquent often made a scapegoat by local police played by Matt Dillon.

As the film progresses, we see the children take to increasing drug use and violence, the latter of which comes to a record high during a parent meeting.

Although the idea that the entire adolescent population of a town would take to violence, arson, and substance abuse is highly exaggerated, the film makes viewers nearly sympathize with the children. From the film’s bland visuals to the police officers’ demonization of the children, New Granada truly seems unbearable. Richie, for example, constantly repeats a story of being caught breaking and entering, demonstrating the dull and monotonous nature of the children’s lives.

The film addresses a topic that many parents wish to avoid: dark issues can arise whether in a

“perfect” suburb or a poor area. A more modern film that deals with similar issues is Behind the a Orange Curtain, a 2012 documentary about drug use in Orange County’s affluent suburbs.

Although Over the Edge deals with serious issues, the film does not demonize the children. Whether waving and smiling while being driven off to prison or finding first significant others, the main characters’ childish natures often shine through their tough demeanors.

Despite  much of the dialogue being seemingly over dramatic, it is fitting in such a serious film. It’s not a comedy, not a romance, and not your typical action film, but this cult classic is definitely worth a watch.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    ENTERTAINMENT

    Destiny 2 review

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    ENTERTAINMENT

    IT review

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    NEWS

    Palo Community Gathers to Honor Teacher in Annual Memorial Ceremony

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    FEATURES

    Teacher of the Century: Cheryl Waldman

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    games & events

    Panthers Take On the Falcons in Annual Thursday Night Lights Game

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    OPINIONS

    Zero Tolerance With Zero Results

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    FEATURES

    Pep Rally Sparks School Pride for First Home Game

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    ENTERTAINMENT

    The Hitman’s Bodyguard review

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    FEATURES

    The Money Fight of 2017

  • #TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)

    ENTERTAINMENT

    Summer Hits 2017: Lorde’s “Melodrama” review

The student news site of Palo Verde High School
#TBT Review: Over the Edge (1979)